SCOTTFIELD Theatre Company

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October 6-8, 13-15

at the

Havre de Grace Opera House

Directed by Allan Herlinger

 

Choreographed by Becky Titelman

Vocally and Musically Directed by

Rick Hauf and Niki Tart

 

What would you do if you had all eternity? 

Eleven-year-old Winnie Foster yearns for a life of adventure beyond her white picket fence, but not until she becomes unexpectedly entwined with the Tuck Family does she get more than she could have imagined. When Winnie learns of the magic behind the Tuck’s unending youth, she must fight to protect their secret from those who would do anything for a chance at eternal life. As her adventure unfolds, Winnie faces an extraordinary choice: return to her life, or continue with the Tucks on their infinite journey.

Based on best-selling children’s classic by Natalie Babbitt and adapted for the stage by Claudia Shear and Tim Federle, Tuck Everlasting features a soaring score from Chris Miller and Nathan Tysen.


 

REVIEWS 

CRITIC'S PICK! "Tuck startles with its emotional resonance and theatrical force! [...] A warm-spirited and piercingly touching musical!" - The New York Times

"Poignancy mixes well with humor, the songs are fresh and sweet [...] The music by Chris Miller is magical, grounded in folk, foot-pounding earthy beats and soaring melodies [...] Nathan Tysen's lyrics are even better - delving into complex themes with elegance [...] Long may it live." - Associated Press

"Magical and a lasting treasure of your cast album collection." - Mark Robinson's cast album review

 

 

April 6-8, 13-15

at the Havre de Grace Opera House

Directed by Allan Herlinger

 

Choreographed and Staged by Becky Titelman

 

Vocally Directed by Niki Tart

Orchestra Direction by Rick Hauf

Through an ingenious doubling scheme created by original Broadway cast member Don Stephenson, Titanic Ensemble Version requires a cast of just 20 to tell the gripping story of the ocean liner’s maiden voyage and tragic demise. The orchestration created by Ian Weinberger requires six players.

The sinking of the Titanic in the early hours of April 15, 1912, remains the quintessential disaster of the twentieth century. A total of 1,517 souls — men, women and children — lost their lives (only 711 survived). The fact that the finest, largest, strongest ship in the world — called, in fact, the “unsinkable” ship — should have been lost during its maiden voyage is so incredible that, had it not actually happened, no author would have dared to contrive it.

But the catastrophe had social ramifications that went far beyond that night’s events. For the first time since the beginning of the industrial revolution early in the 19th Century, bigger, faster and stronger did not prove automatically to be better. Suddenly the very essence of “progress” had to be questioned; might the advancement of technology not always be progress?

 

Nor was this the only question arising from the disaster. The accommodations of the ship, divided into 1st, 2nd and 3rd Classes, mirrored almost exactly the class structure (upper, middle and lower) of the English-speaking world. But when the wide discrepancy between the number of survivors from each of the ship’s classes was revealed — all but two of the women in 1st Class were saved while 155 women and children from 2nd and 3rd (mostly 3rd) drowned — there was a new, long-overdue scrutiny of the prevailing social system and its values.

 

It is not an exaggeration to state that the 19th Century, with its social stricture, its extravagant codes of honor and sacrifice, and its unswerving belief that God favored the rich, ended that night.

The musical play TITANIC examines the causes, the conditions and the characters involved in this ever-fascinating drama. This is the factual story of that ship — of her officers, crew and passengers, to be sure — but she will not, as has happened so many times before, serve as merely the background against which fictional, melodramatic narratives are recounted. The central character of our TITANIC is the Titanic herself.

 

— Peter Stone